Knowledge sharing between supply chain partners offers more positives than negatives

[Deutscher Titel: Wissensteilung zwischen Partnern in der Lieferantenkette bietet mehr Positives als Negatives (Text übersetzen: Deutsch)]

Matthew B. Myers and Mee-Shew Cheung
Sharing Global Supply Chain KnowledgeMIT Sloan Management Review, Volume 49, Number 3, 2008

Abstract: Knowledge sharing between partners has more upsides than downsides, provided that the right kind of knowledge goes back and forth.
There are two categories of supply chain partners: those that buy and those that sell. Depending on which group they identify with, managers have different perspectives on the value of sharing critical knowledge resources with their supply chain partners. Both groups agree that sharing knowledge makes for more efficient supply chains (with lower costs and quicker speeds) and more effective organizations (with higher quality outputs and enhanced customer service). But the benefits of knowledge sharing don’t always accrue equally or simultaneously to all participants.
In addition, some managers think that knowledge sharing between buyers and suppliers has an underappreciated “dark side” that can outweigh the benefits.1 A common worry is that divulging information regarding technologies, pricing schedules, client bases and processes can be copied or shared with competitors. Another worry is that relying on knowledge flows from other organizations can undermine a company’s flexibility and leave it vulnerable to changes in its partners’ priorities. Despite these concerns, knowledge sharing between supply chain partners offers more positives than negatives, provided that the right kind of knowledge goes back and forth.

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